How to Get Rid of Chronic Pain and Its Consequences

Health care professionals should not rush to prescribe opioids, but they should be mindful of their potential for harm.The opioid epidemic has seen the emergence of a new generation of opioid abusers who may be willing to accept even higher doses of the drug, and the opioid-related deaths and overdose numbers in the United States…

Published by admin inNovember 1, 2021
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Health care professionals should not rush to prescribe opioids, but they should be mindful of their potential for harm.

The opioid epidemic has seen the emergence of a new generation of opioid abusers who may be willing to accept even higher doses of the drug, and the opioid-related deaths and overdose numbers in the United States have risen to alarming levels.

And the growing use of opioids by those addicted to the painkillers, even at very low doses, is likely to lead to more deaths.

In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University at Albany examined how long opioid abusers had been using opioids, and they found that they were likely to relapse when their use became chronic.

Their findings appear in the September issue of Pain.

The opioid epidemic The study focused on people with a diagnosis of pain, and it was based on data collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Household Survey on Drug Use and Health.

People who used opioids for at least six months during the study were compared to a control group of people who were not addicted to opioids.

The group of addicted people were compared with people who had never used opioids.

In the addicted group, people who took opioids daily were less likely to have a history of opioid use than people who did not.

The researchers then looked at how much time opioid abusers spent using opioids over a four-month period, as well as whether they had an underlying substance abuse disorder, such as alcohol or drug use disorder, or if they were diagnosed with anxiety, depression, or substance abuse.

People who were addicted to opioid painkillers were more likely to be heavy users of alcohol and cocaine, but their addiction rates did not appear to be related to the severity of their use of other substances.

One important finding of the study is that opioid abuse rates were higher among people who used painkillers daily than among those who did so infrequently or did so sporadically.

In fact, people in the addicted groups who used daily were three times more likely than the non-addicted group to have an alcohol or cocaine use disorder.

The study also found that the likelihood of relapse was high for people who received opioids as part of a long-term treatment plan.

Researchers also found a clear relationship between how much opioids were used and how likely they were to relapse.

People with chronic pain, who were more than three times as likely as people without a chronic pain diagnosis to be addicted to painkillers or illicit drugs, were three to four times as often as those with chronic medical conditions, who did in fact have higher rates of addiction.

The reason why opioid use may be linked to relapse in chronic pain is not yet known, but it is a possible contributing factor to the rise in opioid overdose deaths in the U.S. The authors said the study suggests that it may be important to treat opioid abuse in chronic conditions like pain, not just in patients with chronic conditions.

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